A Bit Of A Niggle

80 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

Sorry to be pedantic folks but it's starting to wind me up:

AFFECT

verb {T}

to have an influence on someone or something, or to cause them to change:

- Both buildings were badly affected by the fire.

- The divorce affected every aspect of her life.

- It's a disease which affects mainly older people.

- I was deeply affected by the film (= It caused strong feelings in me).

EFFECT

verb {T} FORMAL

to achieve something and cause it to happen:

- As a political party they are trying to effect a change in the way that we think about our environment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Sorry to be pedantic folks but it starting to wind me up:

AFFECT

verb {T}

to have an influence on someone or something, or to cause them to change:

- Both buildings were badly affected by the fire.

- The divorce affected every aspect of her life.

- It's a disease which affects mainly older people.

- I was deeply affected by the film (= It caused strong feelings in me).

EFFECT

verb {T} FORMAL

to achieve something and cause it to happen:

- As a political party they are trying to effect a change in the way that we think about our environment.

I take it you struggle to have a crasp of the english language?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I take it you struggle to have a crasp of the english language?

You will never know just what an affect it had on me when I read your post :lol: Crasp.... it's a classic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

You will never know just what an affect it had on me when I read your post :lol: Crasp.... it's a classic.

Well that was the effect I was trying to make! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Well that was the effect I was trying to make! :lol:

Surely it was the affect you were to make? I need more practise at this. There very easy mistakes to make. Your probably finding this boring now...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Sorry to be pedantic folks but it starting to wind me up:

AFFECT

verb {T}

to have an influence on someone or something, or to cause them to change:

- Both buildings were badly affected by the fire.

- The divorce affected every aspect of her life.

- It's a disease which affects mainly older people.

- I was deeply affected by the film (= It caused strong feelings in me).

EFFECT

verb {T} FORMAL

to achieve something and cause it to happen:

- As a political party they are trying to effect a change in the way that we think about our environment.

A man after my own heart - nearly.

Although I agree that "affect" is a common verb, "effect" is more often used as a noun rather than a formal verb. The noun:verb distinction also makes the difference easier to remember:

"The effect (consecutive Es for the noun) of correct grammar is that it can affect (A for Action/verb) whether people think you are a pedant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Poor David P, he'll have apoplexy when he sees the affect that his comment has made... was it the effect he wanted?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Now I'm really struggling to know which of you really do see the point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I need more practise at this.

As this is a picky thread, I feel compelled to point out that that should either be "I need more practice" or "I need to practise this more" (you use C for the noun and S for the verb)!

One way to remember which form of practice/practise and licence/license to use is to imagine replacing the word with advice/advise or device/devise ("I need to devise a device"), which people rarely mix up because those spelling variations are reflected in different pronunciation.

So:

A bit of advice, a device, when a band holds a practice, and your driving licence are all nouns with a C.

But when you advise someone, devise a plan, practise your skills or license your invention, they're verbs with an S.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Unless you're American... but I guess you are referring to English English ! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Unless you're American... but I guess you are referring to English English !

Absolutely. This is, after all, an Amersham forum and last time I checked we weren't fully under Uncle Sam's thumb. And even in Exeter, I believe they use British English, rather than US English (though there may be exceptions in certain pizza restaurants there, but I'm sure Tallguy will advise us on that!) ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Now I'm really struggling to know which of you really do see the point.

Sorry David P, you made a very valid point and we are all being a little bit silly. It must be because it was Tuesday night and so it was still the first half of the week. Now that it's Wednesday we can all be a bit more grown up....maybe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Now that it's Wednesday we can all be a bit more grown up....maybe.

Well if that's what you want, how about some other niggles:

ensure/insure/assure

imply/infer

lose/loose

incredible/incredulous and credulous/credible/creditable

fortuitous/fortunate

flaunt/flout

disinterested/uninterested

less/fewer

decimate

confident/confidant, dependent/ dependant, independent and permanent

And don't get me started on apostrophes - read Lynne Truss instead. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

And don't get me started on apostrophes - read Lynne Truss instead. :lol:

I get peeved when people write your instead of you're (you are) and there/their wrongly. However, as I'm not perfect either, I try to refrain from hitting the roof. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Sorry to be pedantic folks but it starting to wind me up:

Surely you mean "it's starting to wind me up"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

:lol: Ooops.... I believe a-t-o-m-i-c has you there..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

This is just one of the many reasons that I love the amersham.org site.

A topic is started and then morphs into another and then another etc., until it becomes a game of written chinese whispers. I sit and snigger while reading the posts and when I read them to my husband he has a good snigger as well.

Having said the above there are some really serious points covered and then there's.......Exeter Pizza :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Surely you mean "it's starting to wind me up"?

I might have known that I'd do something stupid like that! :(

At least I didn't write 'its'.

Now corrected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

As this is a picky thread, I feel compelled to point out that that should either be "I need more practice" or "I need to practise this more" (you use C for the noun and S for the verb)!

One way to remember which form of practice/practise and licence/license to use is to imagine replacing the word with advice/advise or device/devise ("I need to devise a device"), which people rarely mix up because the those spelling variations are reflected in different pronunciation.

Thanks, its had the desired affect, their'll be no more mistakes from me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Thanks, its had the desired affect, their'll be no more mistakes from me.

I'm calm, I will not hit the roof!!! :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Thanks, its had the desired affect, their'll be no more mistakes from me.

:lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

:lol:

I think you missed the point, Paul. There are 3 (presumably deliberate) errors in Amersham Guy's sentence, not just the one you highlighted in bold, and all three have been discussed earlier on this thread! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I think you missed the point, Paul. There are 3 (presumably deliberate) errors in Amersham Guy's sentence, not just the one you highlighted in bold, and all three have been discussed earlier on this thread! :lol:

Indeed you are correct that the mistakes were deliberate.

Now, does anyone have any aide memoires for confusing pairs such as:

principal / principle

complement / compliment

discrete / discreet

These catch me out quite often.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

OK, another one that bugs me is the inability to distinguish between a noun and an adjective when using measurements.

It's 'a six foot man', but 'the man is six feet tall', not six foot tall.

It's 'a five pound ticket' but 'the ticket costs five pounds', not five pound.

This mistake is now so common as to be almost the norm, even on that one-time guardian of the English language, the BBC.

Curiously, the mistake is rarely made with the smallest units; you rarely hear 'the card is six inch long' and you never hear 'the stamp costs twenty penny'. Unfortunately, 'one pence' is often heard - even worse than 'one pee'.

Oh, and it's surely 'aides memoire'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Now, does anyone have any aide memoires for confusing pairs such as:

principal / principle

complement / compliment

discrete / discreet

Principle. Noun re rules, morals etc (remember "–le" and "legal").

Principal. Noun or adjective denoting someone/thing first or in charge.

The principal reason the school principal resigned was on principle.

Compliment. Noun or verb. This is the more common word, referring to saying nice things about someone or something.

Complement. Noun or verb. Means things that supplement each other or make each other complete (remember complete = complement).

Jack Sprat complimented his wife's cooking and observed that his love of meat complemented her love of fat.

Discreet. Adjective. This is the more common word, meaning tactful or restrained.

Discrete. Adjective. This refers to separate groups.

To help you remember, both words have two Es, but in the one that means separate, the Es are separated (by a T).

The teacher tried to be discreet about the fact that the class was divided into discrete groups.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now