Jump to content


Photo

Not Another Charity Shop


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 zippys

zippys

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 14 December 2011 - 01:48 PM

I see the health shop could be turning in to barnardos, soon the high street will have nothing but charity shops and hair saloons!!

:(

#2 Rob75

Rob75

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 78 posts

Posted 15 December 2011 - 01:39 PM

I see the health shop could be turning in to barnardos, soon the high street will have nothing but charity shops and hair saloons!!

:(


Like the idea of a hair saloon. Like a wild west style barber shop.

#3 Bucks Fizz

Bucks Fizz

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

Posted 20 January 2012 - 04:13 PM

If one has to have a charity shop, Barnardo's is one of the best. The branch in Chalfont St Peter is very well organised, with a great selection of Christmas and other greetings cards etc., and they also have an award winning window display, which changes with the seasons ( 3 Kings at Christmas, Easter bunnies, regatta and Ascot themes etc.). They have been there for years and are a part of the community over there. And most importantly, it's a highly respectable and effective children's charity.

#4 Bluegrass

Bluegrass

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 39 posts

Posted 23 January 2012 - 05:51 PM

Barnardos it is. Things are getting ridiculous. I saw the same thing happen in Ealing/West Ealing. All the normal brand shops closed to be replaced by charity and 99p stores. The high road there is now dead and very very run down. I don't understand how the town council can allow us to be swamped by hairdressers and charity shops. I guess it's down to who is willing to rent a site but surely the TC should be promoting to a diverse range of businesses? Presumably the lack of variety and to some degree quality on the high road reduces footfall and therefore desirability?

I really only go to the High road now for Waitrose or Robert Dyas. Occaisionally the record shop and WH Smiths.

How can we get a decent High Road? Chorleywood have managed it much better than we have.

#5 Jinni

Jinni

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 99 posts

Posted 23 January 2012 - 07:41 PM

Don't blame the Town Council - and the District planners have little control. I am sure they all want to see a vibrant shopping centre. Councils are not the owners of the properties and have no say over who the landlords rent to.

It's a vicious circle - 'chicken and egg': which comes first, the shops or the shoppers. Presumably retailers willl only invest in the town if they foresee the footfall necessary to a successful business. When I shop in AotH it tends to be mainly Woodside Road area -specialist local small traders. Do we have an active trade association these days? Or has that been swept away by the national chains lack of local involvement.

#6 Matthew (MPJ/Admin)

Matthew (MPJ/Admin)

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,954 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 23 January 2012 - 09:48 PM

We used to see posts on this forum from local groups saying local traders would not take part in things such as the Christmas lights. There have also been stories for years saying the rents were very high in the area hindering shops developing
Matthew P Jones
Web Master of www.amersham.org.uk and www.metroland.org.uk

Follow Amershan News & Views on Twitter

Amersham News Views & Information is also on Facebook


Don't forget to read the Forum Rules!

#7 PeterC

PeterC

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 462 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 24 January 2012 - 10:07 AM

Presumably there is some accounting trick that makes an empty shop look better on the landlord's balance sheet than one earning a rent that is affordable by a local business.
PeterC aka Chilternbirder

#8 Rob

Rob

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 57 posts

Posted 24 January 2012 - 02:37 PM

I think I am right in saying that landlords do not pay Council Tax on empty buildings and a very much reduced rate (is it only 20% ?) if occupied by a charity. So.... Bucks County Council gets very, very little business rates but the landlord's building is rising in value - doesn't seem fair to me.
Very happy to hear if this wrong.

#9 roob_the_doob

roob_the_doob

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 596 posts

Posted 24 January 2012 - 11:44 PM

I think I am right in saying that landlords do not pay Council Tax on empty buildings and a very much reduced rate (is it only 20% ?) if occupied by a charity. So.... Bucks County Council gets very, very little business rates but the landlord's building is rising in value - doesn't seem fair to me.
Very happy to hear if this wrong.

Not sure this is quite right - I thought shops paid the uniform business rate, which goes to national government. But I think the general thrust of what you're writing is correct, that there is little or no rate charged on empty buildings, and the rate charged for charitable entgerprises is much lower.

#10 Unremarkable

Unremarkable

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 51 posts

Posted 25 January 2012 - 10:11 AM

Landlords have to pay full business rates on empty property. But when the property is let, the tenant pays the business rates. Charities get 80% discount on business rates, so it's more affordable for them. So if a landlord has a building that is empty, they can cut their own expenses by letting to a charity. I think that's why the Starbucks unit is being used - I guess whoever is using it is paying little or no rent to the landlord but covering the (discounted) business rates.

Retail property values have risen by 0.9% over the last 10 years in Buckinghamshire according to the Investment property databank. So I guess the landlord's return comes mainly from income - which explains why they would be so anxious to get ANY tenant into an empty retail unit.

#11 roob_the_doob

roob_the_doob

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 596 posts

Posted 25 January 2012 - 04:54 PM

Retail property values have risen by 0.9% over the last 10 years in Buckinghamshire according to the Investment property databank. So I guess the landlord's return comes mainly from income - which explains why they would be so anxious to get ANY tenant into an empty retail unit.

I'm not sure how that squares with increasing rents to the point that shops close down though - both Nicolas and Starbucks closed due to rent increases making those units unprofitable. I presume the landlords (think they) know what they are doing.

#12 PeterC

PeterC

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 462 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 25 January 2012 - 08:12 PM

I'm not sure how that squares with increasing rents to the point that shops close down though

I think we need an accountant to explain. There must be some book keeping ju-ju that makes no rent at all look better than a lower rent.
PeterC aka Chilternbirder

#13 Unremarkable

Unremarkable

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 51 posts

Posted 26 January 2012 - 09:54 AM

Sometimes a tenant will still be paying rent on unit they've vacated as they have signed the lease for a number of years. The shop is vacant but still incoming producing from the landlord's point of view. Why would a landlord then relet at a lower rent? I dont' think it's 'book keeping ju-ju'. Just the way the UK property market works, which is hugely in favour of the landlord.